The Li-S battery employs very light active materials: sulfur in the positive electrode and metallic lithium in the negative electrode.

FREMONT, CA: The planet needs more power, ideally safely and sustainably. Today, energy storage strategies are shaped by lithium-ion batteries, at the leading edge of this technology. So, what can one look forward to in the years to come?

Battery industries are continually exploring to find the chemistry that is cheaper, denser, lighter, and more efficient—three emerging developments for batteries with potential revolutionary include.

New Generation Lithium-Ion

In Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, the concentration and release of energy is given by the passage of lithium ions from the positive to the negative electrode back and forth by the electrolyte. In this technology, the positive electrode serves as the original lithium source and the negative electrode as the lithium host. Several chemicals are collected under the term Li-ion batteries due to decades of choice and optimization similar to the perfection of positive and negative active materials. Lithium oxides of metal or phosphates are the most common substance used as present positive materials. Graphite, but also graphite/silicon or lithium oxides are used as harmful ingredients.

Lithium-Sulfur

In Li-ion batteries, lithium ions are contained inactive materials serving as stable host structures during charging and discharge. There are no host systems in lithium-Sulphur (Li-S) batteries. The lithium anode is absorbed during discharging, and the sulfur is converted into several chemical compounds; the opposite step takes place during charging. The Li-S battery employs very light active materials: sulfur in the positive electrode and metallic lithium in the negative electrode. This aspect is why the potential energy density is incredibly high: four times that of Li-ion and makes it a good match for the aviation and space industries.

Solid-State

Solid-state batteries mark a paradigm change in technology. In current Li-ion batteries, ions travel through the liquid electrolyte from one electrode to another (also called ionic conductivity). In all-solid-state batteries, the liquid electrolyte is substituted by a solid compound, which enables lithium ions to migrate within. Due to extensive worldwide study, new families of solid electrolytes have been discovered with very high ionic conductivity within the last ten years, comparable to liquid electrolytes, causing this particular technical obstacle to be overcome.

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